Site Logo
Looking for girlfriend > Looking for boyfriend > How to find a womans hot spot

How to find a womans hot spot

Site Logo

When things are heating up, there are a few obvious places you want your partner to hit: your lips, your nipples, your clit duh. But when it comes to erogenous zones for women—those crazy-sensitive hot spots that can take you from zero to gotta-have-it-right-now—that's barely scratching the surface. Your body is covered in hot spots you may never have even thought to explore. To take things up a notch in the bedroom, venture into some new erogenous zone territory.

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Apical Pulse Assessment Location Nursing - Auscultate and Palpate Apical Pulse

How to stimulate all her hot spots

Site Logo

The existence of the G-spot has not been proven, nor has the source of female ejaculation. Two primary methods have been used to define and locate the G-spot as a sensitive area in the vagina : self-reported levels of arousal during stimulation, and stimulation of the G-spot leading to female ejaculation. Women usually need direct clitoral stimulation in order to orgasm, [13] [14] and G-spot stimulation may be best achieved by using both manual stimulation and vaginal penetration.

One common sex toy is the specially-designed G-spot vibrator , which is a phallus -like vibrator that has a curved tip and attempts to make G-spot stimulation easy. The effects of G-spot stimulation when using the penis or a G-spot vibrator may be enhanced by additionally stimulating other erogenous zones on a woman's body, such as the clitoris or vulva as a whole. When using a G-spot vibrator, this may be done by manually stimulating the clitoris, including by using the vibrator as a clitoral vibrator , or, if the vibrator is designed for it, by applying it so that it stimulates the head of the clitoris, the rest of the vulva and the vagina simultaneously.

Several variables were associated with this perceived existence of female ejaculation. Some research suggests that G-spot and clitoral orgasms are of the same origin. Masters and Johnson were the first to determine that the clitoral structures surround and extend along and within the labia. Upon studying women's sexual response cycle to different stimulation, they observed that both clitoral and vaginal orgasms had the same stages of physical response, and found that the majority of their subjects could only achieve clitoral orgasms, while a minority achieved vaginal orgasms.

On this basis, Masters and Johnson argued that clitoral stimulation is the source of both kinds of orgasms, [21] [22] reasoning that the clitoris is stimulated during penetration by friction against its hood.

Researchers at the University of L'Aquila , using ultrasonography, presented evidence that women who experience vaginal orgasms are statistically more likely to have thicker tissue in the anterior vaginal wall. Supporting Spector's conclusion is a study published in which investigates the size of the clitoris — it suggests that clitoral tissue extends into the anterior wall of the vagina. The main researcher of the studies, Australian urologist Helen O'Connell, asserts that this interconnected relationship is the physiological explanation for the conjectured G-spot and experience of vaginal orgasms, taking into account the stimulation of the internal parts of the clitoris during vaginal penetration.

While using MRI technology, O'Connell noted a direct relationship between the legs or roots of the clitoris and the erectile tissue of the "clitoral bulbs" and corpora, and the distal urethra and vagina. In , they published the first complete 3D sonography of the stimulated clitoris, and republished it in with new research, demonstrating the ways in which erectile tissue of the clitoris engorges and surrounds the vagina.

On the basis of this research, they argued that women may be able to achieve vaginal orgasm via stimulation of the G-spot because the highly innervated clitoris is pulled closely to the anterior wall of the vagina when the woman is sexually aroused and during vaginal penetration. They assert that since the front wall of the vagina is inextricably linked with the internal parts of the clitoris, stimulating the vagina without activating the clitoris may be next to impossible. In , the Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology accepted female prostate as an accurate term for the Skene's gland, which is believed to be found in the G-spot area along the walls of the urethra.

The male prostate is biologically homologous to the Skene's gland; [29] it has been unofficially called the male G-spot because it can also be used as an erogenous zone.

Regnier de Graaf , in , observed that the secretions female ejaculation by the erogenous zone in the vagina lubricate "in agreeable fashion during coitus". Modern scientific hypotheses linking G-spot sensitivity with female ejaculation led to the idea that non-urine female ejaculate may originate from the Skene's gland, with the Skene's gland and male prostate acting similarly in terms of prostate-specific antigen and prostate-specific acid phosphatase studies, [4] [31] which led to a trend of calling the Skene's glands the female prostate.

G-spot amplification also called G-spot augmentation or the G-Shot is a procedure intended to temporarily increase pleasure in sexually active women with normal sexual function, focusing on increasing the size and sensitivity of the G-spot. G-spot amplification is performed by attempting to locate the G-spot and noting measurements for future reference.

After numbing the area with a local anesthetic, human engineered collagen is then injected directly under the mucosa in the area the G-spot is concluded to be in. A position paper published by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in warns that there is no valid medical reason to perform the procedure, which is not considered routine or accepted by the College; and it has not been proven to be safe or effective.

The potential risks include sexual dysfunction, infection, altered sensation, dyspareunia , adhesions and scarring. In addition to general skepticism among gynecologists, sexologists and other researchers that the G-spot exists, [3] [4] [5] [6] a team at King's College London in late suggested that its existence is subjective. They acquired the largest sample size of women to date — 1, — who are pairs of twins, and found that the twins did not report a similar G-spot in their questionnaires.

The research, headed by Tim Spector, documents a year study of the twins, identical and non-identical. According to the researchers, if one identical twin reported having a G-spot, it was more likely that the other would too, but this pattern did not materialize. Petra Boynton, a British scientist who has written extensively on the G-spot debate, is also concerned about the promotion of the G-spot leading women to feel "dysfunctional" if they do not experience it.

It's telling people that there is a single, best way to have sex, which isn't the right thing to do. G-spot proponents are criticized for giving too much credence to anecdotal evidence , and for questionable investigative methods; for instance, the studies which have yielded positive evidence for a precisely located G-spot involve small participant samples. Several researchers also consider the connection between the Skene's gland and the G-spot to be weak.

The G-spot having an anatomical relationship with the clitoris has been challenged by Vincenzo Puppo, who, while agreeing that the clitoris is the center of female sexual pleasure, disagrees with Helen O'Connell and other researchers' terminological and anatomical descriptions of the clitoris.

He stated, "Clitoral bulbs is an incorrect term from an embryological and anatomical viewpoint, in fact the bulbs do not develop from the phallus, and they do not belong to the clitoris. Puppo's belief that there is no anatomical relationship between the vagina and clitoris is contrasted by the general belief among researchers that vaginal orgasms are the result of clitoral stimulation; they maintain that clitoral tissue extends, or is at least likely stimulated by the clitoral bulbs, even in the area most commonly reported to be the G-spot.

Because female fetal development is the "default" direction of fetal development in the absence of substantial exposure to male hormones and therefore the penis is essentially a clitoris enlarged by such hormones, Kilchevsky believes that there is no evolutionary reason why females would have two separate structures capable of producing orgasms and blames the porn industry and "G-spot promoters" for "encouraging the myth" of a distinct G-spot.

The general difficulty of achieving vaginal orgasms, which is a predicament that is likely due to nature easing the process of child bearing by drastically reducing the number of vaginal nerve endings, [1] [3] [42] challenge arguments that vaginal orgasms help encourage sexual intercourse in order to facilitate reproduction.

She stated that it "is best to think of the clitoris, urethra, and vagina as one unit because they are intimately related". A Rutgers University study, published in , was the first to map the female genitals onto the sensory portion of the brain, and supports the possibility of a distinct G-spot. When the research team asked several women to stimulate themselves in a functional magnetic resonance fMRI machine, brain scans showed stimulating the clitoris, vagina and cervix lit up distinct areas of the women's sensory cortex, which means the brain registered distinct feelings between stimulating the clitoris, the cervix and the vaginal wall — where the G-spot is reported to be.

It's a region, it's a convergence of many different structures. In , The Journal of Sexual Medicine held a debate for both sides of the G-spot issue, concluding that further evidence is needed to validate the existence of the G-spot.

The surveys found that a majority of women believe a G-spot actually exists, although not all of the women who believed in it were able to locate it. Attempts to characterize vaginal innervation have shown some differences in nerve distribution across the vagina, although the findings have not proven to be universally reproducible. Furthermore, radiographic studies have been unable to demonstrate a unique entity, other than the clitoris, whose direct stimulation leads to vaginal orgasm.

Objective measures have failed to provide strong and consistent evidence for the existence of an anatomical site that could be related to the famed G-spot. However, reliable reports and anecdotal testimonials of the existence of a highly sensitive area in the distal anterior vaginal wall raise the question of whether enough investigative modalities have been implemented in the search of the G-spot.

A review from Nature Reviews Urology reported that "no single structure consistent with a distinct G-spot has been identified. The release of fluids had been seen by medical practitioners as beneficial to health. Within this context, various methods were used over the centuries to release "female seed" via vaginal lubrication or female ejaculation as a treatment for suffocation ex semine retento suffocation of the womb , female hysteria or green sickness.

Methods included a midwife rubbing the walls of the vagina or insertion of the penis or penis-shaped objects into the vagina. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For other uses, see G-spot disambiguation.

See also: Skene's gland and Urethral sponge. Human sexuality portal. Rosenthal, Martha Human Sexuality: From Cells to Society. Cengage Learning. Retrieved January 25, New York: Thomas Dunne Books. Clinical Manual of Sexual Disorders. American Psychiatric Publishing. Retrieved January 24, Exploring the Dimensions of Human Sexuality.

Retrieved October 30, Am J Obstet Gynecol. The Journal of Sexual Medicine. Lay summary — Huffington Post January 19, October The Journal of Urology. Sex and Society, Volume 2. Marshall Cavendish Corporation. Retrieved August 17, Ashton Acton Biology of Women. Retrieved August 25, Our Sexuality. June Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America. Most women report the inability to achieve orgasm with vaginal intercourse and require direct clitoral stimulation The Big Book of Sex Toys.

The Journal of Sex Research. Journal of Sex Research. Newman Hippocrates' Shadow. Taverner McGraw-Hill Education. J Sex Marital Ther. Arch Sex Behav. A New View of a Woman's Body. Feminist Health Press. Sex and Gender. Cambridge University Press. Harvard University Press. Retrieved 5 January New Science Publications original from University of California.

Everything You Want to Know About Male and Female Erogenous Zones

While certain bits of anatomy ahem, genitalia are well-known as sites of sexual pleasure, getting turned on doesn't have to be limited to below the belt. Other areas of the human body have a high concentration of nerve endings, so they're particularly sensitive to touch, pressure, or vibration. These so-called " erogenous zones " can contribute to sexual arousal—think of them as the road map to a happy ending. According to Monica Geller of Friends , there are seven erogenous zones on a woman's body , but the exact list for any gender remains up to speculation.

In , a scientific review came to the conclusion that there isn't much anatomical proof that every woman has a G-spot, but anecdotal evidence and "reliable reports" say that there is indeed a specific area inside the vagina that, when stimulated, may help some women reach orgasm. Researchers have come a long way since then— kind of. Yes, you read that correctly.

Friday, July 03, The C Spot The C spot or the clitoris is a very sensitive part of the female body. The clitoris contains many nerve endings which react to direct stimulation so much so that an orgasm can result. Essentially this is a group of erectile tissues which can become filled with blood when a woman is sexually excited. The A Spot The A spot refers to the anterior fornix.

Everything You Need to Know About the G Spot

Women have four hot spots. Did you know this? Well, lo and behold, we ladies also have an A-Spot. So, without further delay, here is a description of what each hot spot is, where it is located and how it can be stimulated through foreplay , sex and toys. Clitoris This is the most sensitive spot on the female body. The visible part is the tiny, nipple-sized, female equivalent of the tip of the penis, and is partially covered by a hood. When aroused, it becomes swollen and erect. Part of the clit is hidden beneath the surface and extends down to the vaginal opening.

7 Sex Positions That Work Her G-Spot And Clit At The Same Time

The existence of the G-spot has not been proven, nor has the source of female ejaculation. Two primary methods have been used to define and locate the G-spot as a sensitive area in the vagina : self-reported levels of arousal during stimulation, and stimulation of the G-spot leading to female ejaculation. Women usually need direct clitoral stimulation in order to orgasm, [13] [14] and G-spot stimulation may be best achieved by using both manual stimulation and vaginal penetration. One common sex toy is the specially-designed G-spot vibrator , which is a phallus -like vibrator that has a curved tip and attempts to make G-spot stimulation easy.

Helena Lorimer May 12,

If you buy something through a link on this page, we may earn a small commission. How this works. Technically known as the anterior fornix erogenous zone, this pleasure point is located deep inside the vagina between the cervix and the bladder. Only cisgender women and people assigned female at birth have the potential to reach this spot.

Yes, You Have a G-Spot

So this week we're discussing good sex and why it matters. Our mantra? Owning your sexual pleasure is power.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How To Find The G Spot

The story you're about to read was published prior to our April investigation on the G-spot. The truth is: It doesn't exist. Learn more here. Even if you haven't personally experienced its power, you've heard about the G-spot: an erogenous zone located inside the vagina that can produce some pretty intense sensations. Thing is, it can also produce some intense frustration because it is, for many women, so damn elusive.

How To Find Your G-Spot So You Can Have The Strongest Orgasms Ever

Orgasms can help reduce stress, improve your skin, and make you feel, well, great. However, for many women, orgasms — especially those achieved through penetration — can be just as elusive as the mysterious G spot. In fact, according to a study, only about 18 percent of women achieve orgasm through penetration alone — meaning no hands, mouth, or toys needed. More often than not, clitoral stimulation is required, or at least beneficial, when it comes to orgasming during sex. Some believe that the G spot may be the key to women achieving orgasm during penetration. But is it real? She believed that this region could be the key to women achieving orgasm during sex.

Most people focus on the throat when things get heated, but the nape or back of the neck is another hot zone. Depending on the position, it can be difficult for.

The elusive G-spot is one of the most hotly debated areas when it comes to women's sexual health. But despite what you may have been told in your less-than-great seventh grade sex education class, the G-spot most definitely exists and is absolutely accessible. That said, some people might think the G-spot doesn't exist simply because not every woman has one.

Do you have G-spot envy? Now try and find the A-spot and the U-spot!

Most women love to be nurtured, teased and touched before they are pleased. Teasing these areas will awaken her sensuality and tantalize her to bliss. Not all women are created equally.

How to Find Your G-Spot, and C-Spot, and A-Spot

Teesha Morgan introduces two new pleasure zones and explains why they're also worth searching for. Teesha Morgan Updated January 19, And while the G-spot is said to produce some very pleasurable sensations, it should learn to share the spotlight with a few other areas of the female body. You may wonder what other areas of the female body, aside from the clitoris loosely referred to the female equivalent of the penis , could possibly out shadow the G-spot?

But what about positions that—wait for it—stimulate both hot spots at the same time? Yes, those magical unicorn positions do exist and they're bound to result in a mind-blowing orgasm.

.

.

.

Comments: 1
  1. Malataur

    Good gradually.

Thanks! Your comment will appear after verification.
Add a comment

© 2020 Online - Advisor on specific issues.