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Get certificate friendly name powershell

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The background for this article is based on a need to use an alternate domain name in Localhost and make the certificate trusted. You should be able to resolve it, and even use it if you like, as dev. Open Powershell as an administrator. This step is important. Powershell must be launched in administrative mode or the process will fail. Enter the following command, replacing the "dev.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Free SSL certificate with PowerShell, DNS and Let's Encrypt

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How to Sign a Script with Powershell

Get-Certificate

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The New-SelfSignedCertificate cmdlet creates a self-signed certificate for testing purposes. Using the CloneCert parameter, a test certificate can be created based on an existing certificate with all settings copied from the original certificate except for the public key.

The cmdlet creates a new key of the same algorithm and length. Delegation may be required when using this cmdlet with Windows PowerShell remoting and changing user configuration. This example creates a self-signed SSL server certificate in the computer MY store with the subject alternative name set to www. This example creates a copy of the certificate specified by the CloneCert parameter and puts it in the computer MY store. The certificate uses an RSA asymmetric key with a key size of bits.

This certificate has the subject alternative names of patti. This command does not specify the NotAfter parameter. Therefore, the certificate expires in one year. This example creates a self-signed client authentication certificate in the user MY store. The certificate has a subject alternative name of pattifuller contoso. The certificate uses an elliptic curve asymmetric key and the curve parameters nist, which creates a bit key.

The subject alternative name is pattifuller contoso. The certificate uses the Microsoft Platform Crypto Provider. The key is an RSA bit key that cannot be exported.

The certificate expires in one year. This command specifies a value for NotAfter. The certificate expires in six months. This example creates a self-signed SSL server certificate with Subject and Issuer name set to localhost and with subject alternative name set to IPAddress Specifies the certificate store in which to store the new certificate.

This parameter does not support other certificate stores. Identifies the certificate to copy when creating a new certificate. The certificate being cloned can be identified by an X certificate or the file path in the certificate provider. When this parameter is used, all fields and extensions of the certificate will be inherited except the public key, a new key of the same algorithm and length will be created, and the NotAfter and NotBefore fields.

The default validity period will be the same as the certificate to copy, except that the NotBefore field will be set to ten minutes in the past. An appended GUID string makes the container name unique. When you use an existing key, the container name must identify an existing key. You may also have to specify the provider.

Specifies how the public key parameters for an elliptic curve key are represented in the new certificate. The acceptable values for this parameter are:.

The default value, None, indicates that this cmdlet uses the default value from the underlying key storage provider KSP. Specifies one or more DNS names to put into the subject alternative name extension of the certificate when a certificate to be copied is not specified via the CloneCert parameter.

Indicates that this cmdlet uses an existing key. If you do not specify this parameter, this cmdlet creates a new key. Creating a certificate from an existing key creates a new key with a new container.

When you use an existing key, specify values for the Container parameter, the Provider parameter, and the CertStoreLocation parameter. CertStoreLocation determines the context. The context is user or computer. Specifies an array of certificate extensions, as XExtension objects, that this cmdlet includes in the new certificate. Specifies how a hardware key associated with the new certificate may be used. This parameter applies only when you specify the Microsoft Platform Crypto Provider.

The default value, None, indicates that this cmdlet uses the default value from the underlying KSP. Specifies the name of the hash algorithm to use to sign the new certificate. The default hash algorithm depends on the provider that stores the private key used to sign the new certificate. Specifies the name of the algorithm that creates the asymmetric keys that are associated with the new certificate. Specifies the policy that governs the export of the private key that is associated with the certificate.

Specify NonExportable for providers that do not allow key export. Specifies the file system location where this cmdlet stores the private keys associated with the new certificate. Specify this parameter only when you specify the Microsoft Platform Crypto Provider. Specifies the level of protection required to access the private key that is associated with the certificate.

A user interface is required if the provider always requires a user interface, such as a smart card, or if the default configuration of the provider has been changed. Specifies whether the private key associated with the new certificate can be used for signing, encryption, or both. The default value, None, indicates that this cmdlet uses the default value from the underlying CSP. Specifies the key usages set in the key usage extension of the certificate. The value, None , indicates that this cmdlet does not include the KeyUsage extension in the new certificate.

Specifies the key usages for the key usages property of the private key. The default value, None , indicates that this cmdlet uses the default value from the underlying KSP. Specifies the date and time, as a DateTime object, that the certificate expires. To obtain a DateTime object, use the Get-Date cmdlet.

The default value for this parameter is one year after the certificate was created. Specifies the date and time, as a DateTime object, when the certificate becomes valid. The default value for this parameter is 10 minutes before the certificate was created. Specifies the personal identification number PIN used to access the private key of the new certificate. See Cryptographic Providers for more information. Some acceptable values include:. Specifies the name of the smart card reader on which to store the private key for the new certificate.

Specifies the private key security descriptor as a FileSecurity object. Read access is required to use the private key. This parameter does not apply to providers that do not support security descriptors on private keys, including the smart card CSP and smart card KSP. Specifies a serial number, as a hexadecimal string, that is associated with the new certificate. If you do not specify this parameter, this cmdlet assigns a pseudo-randomly generated 16 byte value.

Specifies a Certificate object with which this cmdlet signs the new certificate. This value must be in the Personal certificate store of the user or device. This cmdlet must have read access to the private key of the certificate.

Specifies the PIN that is required to access the private key of the certificate that is used to sign the new certificate. Specifies the string that appears in the subject of the new certificate. For multiple subject relative distinguished names also known as RDNs , separate each subject relative distinguished name with a comma ,.

If the value of the relative distinguished name contains commas, separate each subject relative distinguished name with a semicolon ;. Specifies an array of object identifier also known as OID strings that identify default extensions to be removed from the new certificate.

Indicates that this cmdlet signs the new certificate by using a built-in test certificate. This cmdlet adds the built-in test certificate to the intermediate certification authority CA certificate store of the device. This parameter is for test purposes only. The private key of the test root certificate is essentially public. Specifies an array of certificate extensions, as strings, which this cmdlet includes in the new certificate. Each string must employ one of the following formats:.

After decoding hexidecimalString, the value must be valid ASN. String must contain a textual representation of the extension value in a format specific to each object ID.

When String is processed, it will be encoded into an ASN. Application Policy 1. These entries are subordinate to the preceding object identifier. Certificate Policies 2. To specify a Certificate Policies extension, follow the same syntax as an Application Policy extension. Enhanced Key Usage Object Identifiers 2. Name Constraints 2. Subject Alternative Name Syntax 2.

Specifies the type of certificate that this cmdlet creates. The Certificate object can either be provided as a Path object to a certificate or an XCertificate2 object. You may also leave feedback directly on GitHub.

Looking at Installed Certificates with PowerShell

While working on adding a new feature in the certificate request DSC resource, I came across this handy little trick: You can change the Friendly Name of a certificate using PowerShell. All you need to do is identify the certificate using Get-ChildItem and then assign the new FriendlyName to it. Sometimes PowerShell still surprises me at how easy it can make things. You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account.

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. Server Fault is a question and answer site for system and network administrators. It only takes a minute to sign up.

Summary : Certificate management is always challenging. The feature allows Hyper-V VMs to access storage targets simultaneously. This question has come up at multiple customer sites, as they plan a new PKI infrastructure or a revamp of their current one! My current customer needed to find self-signed certificates, so we took this local scan example and wrapped it in Invoke-Parallel to scan targeted systems!

FriendlyName is not returning the Template name

The usual procedure for creating a certificate request is to launch the IIS or certificates MMC and use the wizard shown below:. As usual, the GUI is good for a one-time request. However, if you need to create several requests, PowerShell is the better option. The certreq. As with the GUI, you have to run the tool on each server individually. However, since this utility can work with the preconfigured. I decided to run this script from an admin workstation to save the time it takes to log on to a remote computer. The first variable sets the certificate name, or friendly name, and the next two variables are the paths to the certificate request files, one for the path to the INF file that will be used as a template for the certreq.

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This tool is included in the Microsoft. To create a certificate, you have to specify the values of —DnsName DNS name of a server, the name may be arbitrary and different from localhost name and -CertStoreLocation a local certificate store in which the generated certificate will be placed. To create a certificate for the DNS name test. Directory: Microsoft. This command creates a certificate and imports it in a personal store of the computer.

Seems I was just too blind to notice it earlier. Thanks to Michel De Rooij for pointing this out.

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. FriendlyName -eq ''. However, the '' ' value applied vice a versa doesn't provide the expected result.

Create a certificate request with PowerShell

Make use of hands-on recipes for many tasks that are typically encountered in both the on-premises as well as the cloud world. This book will follow a recipe-based approach and start off with an introduction to the fundamentals of PowerShell, and explaining how to install and run it through simple examples. Next, you will learn how to use PowerShell to access and manipulate data and how to work with different streams as well. You will also explore the object model which will help with regard to PowerShell function deployment.

The PowerShell Certificate provider lets you get, add, change, clear, and delete certificates and certificate stores in PowerShell. The Certificate drive is a hierarchical namespace containing the cerificate stores and certificates on your computer. The Certificate provider supports the following cmdlets, which are covered in this article. Store locations Microsoft. XStoreLocation , which are high-level containers that group the certificates for the current user and for all users.

Certificate Provider

The New-SelfSignedCertificate cmdlet creates a self-signed certificate for testing purposes. Using the CloneCert parameter, a test certificate can be created based on an existing certificate with all settings copied from the original certificate except for the public key. The cmdlet creates a new key of the same algorithm and length. Delegation may be required when using this cmdlet with Windows PowerShell remoting and changing user configuration. This example creates a self-signed SSL server certificate in the computer MY store with the subject alternative name set to www. This example creates a copy of the certificate specified by the CloneCert parameter and puts it in the computer MY store. The certificate uses an RSA asymmetric key with a key size of bits.

The Certificate Export Wizard will prompt you for a file name. Browse to a directory and give the file a friendly name with mcauliffecarroll.com extension. For example, in My.

If more than one certificate matches, they will be looped into individually The function will call itself recursively until the issuer and the subject are the same — which means we have reached the Root CA. The above code runs the Function on remote computers using invoke-command. Starts by creating an array of computer names which you would like to remotely run the function against. Creates a parameter to pass the certificate you are looking for Create a definition to the function so we can pass it to each remote invoke-command. Loop inside the array of computers and pass the function and run it against each one of them using invoke-command.

Gets a certificate from a file on the file system or from a Windows certificate store by thumbprint or friendly name. Certificates can be files or they can be in a Windows certificate store. This function returns an XCertificate2 object for a script that's a file on the file system or a cert stored in Microsoft's certificate store. You can get a certificate from a certificate store with its unique thumbprint or its friendly name.

This cmdlet generates a self-signed or CA-signed certificate with various options. Note: self-signed certificates non-CA should not be used in a production environment, they are generally intended for testing purposes only. Specifies the certificate subject in a X distinguished name format. Specifies the date and time when the certificate become valid.

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